About Color August Macke's vivid shades still resonate a century after his death August Macke (1887-1914) achieved notoriety at an early age, only to be killed at the tender age of 27 at the start of World War I. Despite his brief career, the artist left a remarkable oeuvre in his wake, in which his obsessions with color reflected aspects of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, and Expressionism. Through his engagement with these diverse schools of art, Macke assimilated disparate influences and approaches into a style entirely his own. Grouped with the Blaue Reiter movement, but eschewing the mysticism that often pervaded the works of its artists, Macke returned time and again to color-led interpretations of beauty, whether the kaleidoscopic watercolor Hat Shop (1913), or the shimmering hues of Woman in a Green Jacket (1913). These colors reached their zenith in 1914 when Macke traveled with Klee and Moilliet to Tunis and became acquainted with North African light. With leading examples from his vivid painterly world, this book introduces us to Macke's short but influential